We sponsor research to bring about change in how women and girls are dealt with in the criminal justice system

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Research Papers and Briefings

At the end of their year on the Griffins Society Fellowship Programme, Fellows produce a 10,000 word Research Paper on their findings. Research Papers are available here to view or download as a PDF (the size of each file is given).  

For all papers you will find the REPORT IN FULL, and also a single-page ABSTRACT.  For more recent papers, an EXECUTIVE SUMMARY is also available.

Fellows' research can be freely copied and distributed as long as the author and the Griffins Society are credited.


 

Just no future at the moment: Examining the barriers to community resettlement for foreign national women

Author: 
Sophia Benedict
Published: 
2020

The overarching aim of this study was to examine and explore the barriers to resettlement for foreign national women living in the community in the UK, and to shed light on the complex ways in which non-citizen immigration status shapes the lived reality of resettlement for this group. In recent years, there has been an increased focus by the UK government on the deportation of ‘foreign national criminals’ on completion of their sentence, an emphasis that has geared foreign national women’s pathways through the CJS strongly towards the possibility of deportation, over rehabilitation and resettlement. Yet, many foreign national women are released into the community post sentence – indeed, 260 women in 2017 (Ministry of Justice 2019), in addition to women serving community sentences. By interviewing women in open, semi-structured conversations, my aim was to identify and gain much needed insight into the challenges they face, giving space for women to voice the struggles – often painfully sustained and unyielding – that shape their daily lives in the community and render rehabilitative goals impossible. By interviewing practitioners, I aimed to identify the barriers they come up against in providing support and to ask how these could be addressed. Ultimately, the research makes recommendations for urgently needed improvements to current provision for this group.

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Exploring the experiences of minority ethnic women in resettlement: what role if any, does ethnic culture play in the resettlement of Black (African-Caribbean) women offenders in the UK?

Author: 
Elizabeth Owens
Published: 
2010

The aim was to explore the experiences of black and minority ethnic women in resettlement in order to form a picture of resettlement from their perspective and to determine what, if any, role ethnic culture played in resettlement. Four questions were formed as guidance: 1. What are the resettlement needs of minority ethnic women? 2. What role does ethnic culture play in the resettlement of minority ethnic women in the UK? 3. How do minority ethnic women access and understand resettlement services? Is this influenced by their ethnic culture? If yes, to what degree, and how? 4. How are some providers successfully engaging these women? What are the ‘challenging’ areas to work on in making services accessible and meaningful to these women?

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An evaluation of The Freedom Programme: a prison support programme for women who have experienced domestic violence

Author: 
Lucy Watkins
Published: 
2009

This research evaluated The Freedom Programme - a group work support programme for women in prison. Three research questions were addressed: does the programme help women to develop ways of thinking and behaving that protect themselves, their children and others from harm; is the programme of equal value for BME women, lesbian women etc. as it is for white heterosexual women; and to what extent do women value the process of being able to discuss, share and explore issues with other women? The research questions were addressed through 14 interviews with women who attended the programme, four interviews with facilitators and observation of two sessions.

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Exploring provisions for women in approved premises

Author: 
Gilliam McLeish
Published: 
2005

This study explores female need and provision within Approved Premises settings, primarily the particular needs of female residents/offenders including bailees, probationers and licensees. The study examines the structure of support to help women regain control of their lives, to empower them to progress to the next stage, ie. semi independent/independent living. It aims to highlight the strengths, weaknesses and, effectiveness of regimes in reducing offending for women; and to identify any gaps which exist. NB. The term Approved Premises refers to (Home Office) defined standards of practice.

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