We sponsor research to bring about change in how women and girls are dealt with in the criminal justice system

Our research listings

Research Papers and Briefings

At the end of their year on the Griffins Society Fellowship Programme, Fellows produce a 10,000 word Research Paper on their findings. Research Papers are available here to view or download as a PDF (the size of each file is given).  

For all papers you will find the REPORT IN FULL, and also a single-page ABSTRACT.  For more recent papers, an EXECUTIVE SUMMARY is also available.

Fellows' research can be freely copied and distributed as long as the author and the Griffins Society are credited.


 

Exploring provisions for women in approved premises

Author: 
Gilliam McLeish
Published: 
2005

This study explores female need and provision within Approved Premises settings, primarily the particular needs of female residents/offenders including bailees, probationers and licensees. The study examines the structure of support to help women regain control of their lives, to empower them to progress to the next stage, ie. semi independent/independent living. It aims to highlight the strengths, weaknesses and, effectiveness of regimes in reducing offending for women; and to identify any gaps which exist. NB. The term Approved Premises refers to (Home Office) defined standards of practice.

Download PDF - 87.79 KB

Last Chance: older women through the Criminal Justice System

Author: 
Carlie Newman
Published: 
2005

This research project focusses on older women in the criminal justice system and aimed to: • ascertain what proportion of older women offenders (50+) make up the growing prison population; • examine community sentences and other punishments given as an alternative to custody, for this group; • provide a focus on the rehabilitation and resettlement of older women on their release from prison, especially those with drug and alcohol problems; • examine the role of outside agencies in the resettlement of older women offenders and to determine their effectiveness. The research is based on interviews with offenders, magistrates, judges, justices’ clerks, probation officers, representatives of voluntary organisations, a deputy prison governor and government ministers.

Download PDF - 88.1 KB
Download PDF - 1.04 MB

'What Works' with women who offend: A service user's perspective. Exploring the synthesis between what women want and what women get

Author: 
Rebecca Clarke
Published: 
2004

The aim of this project was to explore the relationship between what women in the criminal justice system want and need to desist from further offending, and what criminal justice and other associated agencies provide. A review of the literature exploring these issues, together with the information generated from the women’s accounts of their experiences, form the evidence contained in the full report.

Download PDF - 88.82 KB

Supporting People: Good news for women ex-prisoners?

Author: 
Sally Malin
Published: 
2004

The importance of housing in the resettlement of women ex-offenders is well established. Supporting People (SP) is a UK government programme which took effect in April 2003, bringing together at local authority level the main partners of housing, health, social services and probation to plan strategically and commission services which are cost effective, reliable, transparent and needs-led. This research project carried out between October 2003 and December 2004 sought, through interviews and document review, to explore the early impact of SP at both national and local levels on planning and provision for women ex-offenders. A comparative perspective was secured by review of two community based ex-offender initiatives outside the UK.

Download PDF - 88.99 KB

An exploration of the health and health care needs of female offenders

Author: 
Jane Sheen
Published: 
2002

This study was prompted by a desire to explore in more depth the health and health care needs of current and resettling female offenders — at a time when prisoner health needs and health care requirements were to be moved from the prison service into the mainstream NHS.

Download PDF - 87.19 KB